Packard Family, The

The Packard Family

Year

Affiliation

Areas of Focus

Environment | Child Welfare | Arts

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation was created in 1964 by David Packard and Lucile Salter Packard. They shared a deep and abiding interest in giving back to the community and dedicated themselves to philanthropic causes throughout their lives.

In establishing the Foundation, they chose issues for support that were close to them and that they believed could improve the quality of life for many individuals: ensuring opportunities for all children to reach their potential, enhancing women’s reproductive health and stabilizing world population, conserving and restoring earth’s natural systems, and encouraging the creative pursuit of science.

The Foundation continues to be guided by the core values that David and Lucile passed on—integrity, respect for all people, belief in individual leadership, commitment to effectiveness and the capacity to think big and to build on its history of family involvement and past program successes. The Foundation is governed by a Board of Trustees that includes five members of the Packard Family and other individuals with wide-ranging expertise.

The Foundation provides national and international grants, and also has a special focus on the Northern California Counties of San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, and Monterey. The Foundation’s assets were approximately $5.2 billion as of December 31, 2004. General program grant awards totaled approximately $217 million in 2004. The Foundation has a grantmaking budget of approximately $200 million in 2005.

Susan Packard Orr will accept on behalf of the family. She founded Telosa Software, Inc. (formerly named TRAC, Inc.) in 1986. Telosa provides fundraising and donor management software for nonprofit organizations, and she has served as Telosa’s Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board since the company’s inception. Prior to starting Telosa, she worked as a programmer at Health Computer Services at the University of Minnesota and as an economist at the National Institutes of Health. She is currently Chairman of the Board at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and is a trustee of Stanford University, the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, the Stanford University Hospital, the Monterey Bay Aquarium, the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, and the Packard Humanities Institute. She served for seven years on the board of Hewlett-Packard Company.

Ms. Orr noted, “We’re very privileged to share this privilege with the other Carnegie Medal recipients today. Like Andrew Carnegie my mother and father felt it a great honor that the success of the Hewlett Packard Company allowed them to support efforts to secure a better future for us all.”

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Hewlett Family, The

The Hewlett Family

Year

Affiliation

Areas of Focus

Education | Environment | Arts | Sustainable Development

Nearly forty years after Bill and Flora Hewlett started the Hewlett Foundation in the living room of their Palo Alto house, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation is one of the largest private foundations in the United States, with assets of more than $6 billion. The Foundation now makes hundreds of grants per year totaling hundreds of millions of dollars, but the principles that guide its grantmaking are the same as those that inspired them to begin the institution so many years ago—a sincere and heartfelt commitment to help build strong institutions that make a difference in the community and around the world.

Entrepreneur William R. Hewlett established the Hewlett Foundation in 1966 with his wife, Flora, and their eldest son, Walter B. Hewlett. For the first ten years, the Foundation, then known as the William R. Hewlett Foundation, made approximately $15.3 million in grants to organizations in education, population, the arts, and social services.

In 1977, Mrs. Hewlett died and the Foundation was renamed The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and her oldest daughter, Eleanor Hewlett Gimon, replaced her on the board. The bulk of Mrs. Hewlett’s fortune was transferred to the Foundation.

Highly respected for its work in the fields of conflict resolution, education, environment, performing arts, and population, the Foundation was a key source of funding to a host of institutions that provide vital services to disadvantaged Bay Area communities.

The Foundation’s assets increased to more than $2 billion, and annual grantmaking rose from $35 million in 1993 to $84 million in 1998. They focused at that time on environmental grantmaking on the Western United States and Canada, education funding, neighborhood improvement initiatives, and the U.S.-Latin American Relations Program.

Another foundation, the Flora Family Foundation was set up in 1998 and its grantmaking totaled $19.4 million in its first four years of operation. Perhaps as important is the fact that the Flora Family Foundation has given the next generation of Hewlett family members an opportunity to learn about philanthropy and to make a positive difference in the lives of others.

Representing the family at the Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy is Eleanor Hewlett Gimon. In 1977 she joined the board of directors of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the Family Foundation of North America and was also a trustee of Brown University for six years. She is also involved with the Flora Family Foundation, a foundation she created with her siblings to encourage the next generation to become active in philanthropy. In the spirit of Andrew Carnegie, Ms. Gimon noted “My father never expected to accumulate great wealth but when he did, it was clear to both of my parents that they had to give it away.”

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Cadbury Family, The

The Cadbury Family

Year

Affiliation

Areas of Focus

Human Rights | Immigration | Poverty

The Cadbury family has a long established tradition of philanthropy. Driven by a passion for social reform linked to the family’s Quaker beliefs, John Cadbury, who founded the chocolate business in 1831, was committed to public service and a significant supporter of charitable causes, notably child laborers. His sons, Richard and George, who took over the business in 1861, continued their father’s work in support of voluntary and public work that promoted a more just society.

In 1920, the Barrow Cadbury Trust (as the Barrow and Geraldine S. Cadbury Trust) was established. The Barrow Cadbury Trust’s endowment is today worth around £65 million following a merger with the Paul S. Cadbury Trust in 1994. Since its launch, the original endowment has been significantly added to by a number of the founder’s descendants.

The Barrow Cadbury Trust is a charitable foundation that seeks to encourage an equal, peaceful, and democratic society. As an independent body, the Trust funds innovative, even risky community projects, unusual charities that help provide solutions to local problems and drive social change. Since its founding, the Trust has invested over £150 million in some of the most deprived communities in the UK and in conflict-torn regions across the globe.

The Trust is unique in its long-standing status as a family run foundation. The Board of Trustees has only ever included direct descendants of its founders and has now reached its fifth generation of members. It is currently chaired by Anna Southall who accepted the award on behalf of her family.

She became a Trustee in 1974 and worked for forty years, largely but not exclusively in the cultural sector, initially in paintings conservation. After seventeen years at Tate Gallery, she became Director of the National Museums & Galleries of Wales (1996-2002) and Chief Executive of the Museums, Libraries & Archives Council (2002-2003).

Ms. Southall has held a range of non-executive roles with government advisory bodies and voluntary sector organizations.

Anna Southall said: “I think Andrew Carnegie’s belief that ‘to die rich is to die disgraced’ would have chimed extremely well with our forebears—and as, if you like, a birthright philanthropist, I have to say that I am immensely grateful to those forebears that I have this birthright rather than being a wealthy heiress.”

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Farmer, Sir Tom

Sir Tom Farmer

Year

Affiliation

Sir Tom Farmer Foundation

Areas of Focus

Poverty

Sir Tom Farmer is acknowledged as one of Scotland’s foremost entrepreneurs and philanthropists. Throughout his commercial and private life, Sir Tom has applied a profound Christian and Philanthropic ethic. This has driven an outstanding career in business. In 1971 he set up Kwik Fit selling tires and exhausts. He built Kwik Fit into one of the most admired retailing organizations and served as a recognized leader in the development and training of its people, standards of customer service and corporate social responsibility.

In both his business and personal life, he committed himself to using the resources available to him to help others. Amongst his many activities, he opened up his Kwik Fit centers to receive aid from the public for victims of the war in Kosovo, chaired the Scotland Against Drugs campaign and supported public access to the arts. He established the Farmer Foundation to provide support to local communities, both at home and abroad to develop self-sufficient means of community and personal development.

The leadership that Sir Tom provided at Kwik Fit led to a number of public service appointments, including founding board member of Scottish Enterprise, Chairman of Scottish Business in the Community and board member of Investors in People. He is currently Chairman of the Duke of Edinburgh Award. International recognition of his work includes Officier in de Orde van Orange-Nassau of the Netherlands and the Knight Cross of the Order of Merit of the Republic of Poland.

In 1999, Ford purchased Kwik Fit for over £1 billion. He now oversees an extensive portfolio of retailing, commercial property, and other business investments.

Says Sir Tom: “It was a pleasant surprise to be nominated to receive the Andrew Carnegie Medal. Throughout my life I have tried to encourage people to support each other in their family, work, and community so that we can all develop together. The Carnegie Foundations provide so much throughout the world to people in terms of opportunities for education and self-development. It is a great honour to be recognised by them.”

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Gund, Agnes

Agnes Gund

Year

Affiliation

The Agnes Gund Foundation

Areas of Focus

Arts | Education

Agnes Gund has been the president of the Museum of Modern Art since 1991. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, her mother used to take her to Saturday morning art classes at the Cleveland Museum. Her father was George Gund, Jr. and was the president of the Cleveland Trust Company for twenty-five years and he made his fortune in many areas. His legacy lives on as the George Gund Foundation, which is one of the most important foundations for northeast Ohio, particularly for the arts, the environment, and education. The foundation was one of the earliest and most generous founders at the outset of the AIDS crisis.

Ms. Gund was elected a trustee of the Museum of Modern Art in 1976. In 1977, after New York City budget cuts eliminated art classes in the public schools she founded the Studio in a School Association. It brought artists to New York City public schools to help children develop their own sense of art at an early age. The program even helped raise the reading scores of the students.
She was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Clinton in 1997. In recognizing Gund, the president said, “We can’t celebrate art today without celebrating the people who help us experience it. Aggie Gund has spent a lifetime bringing art into the lives of the American people.”

She is Chairman of Mayor Bloomberg’s Cultural Affairs advisory Commission in New York and a member of numerous charitable trusts, including the Barnes Foundation (Philadelphia), J. Paul Getty Trust (Los Angeles), The Menil Collection (Houston), and the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation, NY.

In the UK, Ms. Gund is a supporter of the Tate and Serpentine galleries, as well as the British Museum and the Royal Academy trust.
She has shown her affinity to Andrew Carnegie, as her quote attests: “I think everyone is proud of they can leave their children better off than they were. But there’s a difference between better off and hugely wealthy. I don’t think anyone needs to make huge amounts of money or inherit huge amounts of money without giving to the public good.”

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Aga Khan, His Highness

His Highness Aga Khan

Year

Affiliation

Areas of Focus

Economic Development | Arts | Health

The search for justice and security, the struggle for equality of opportunity, the quest for tolerance and harmony, the pursuit of human dignity – these are moral imperatives which we must work towards and think about on a daily basis.

His Highness, the Aga Khan, became Imam (spiritual leader) of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims on July 11, 1967 at the age of twenty, succeeding his grandfather, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah Aga Khan. He is the 49th hereditary Imam of the Ismaili Community and a direct descendant of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) through his cousin and son-in-law, Ali the first Imam, and his wife Fatima, the Prophet’s daughter.

In the late-nineteenth century, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah created a number of agencies to meet the social and economic needs of the Community in South Asia and East Africa. Over the last four and a half decades, the present Aga Khan has expanded the scope and geographical reach of these agencies and brought them together as the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN).

Agencies of the AKDN include the Aga Khan Agency for Microfinance, the Aga Khan Foundation, the Aga Khan Education Services, the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development, the Aga Khan Health Services, the Aga Khan Planning and Building Services, the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, the Aga Khan University and the University of Central Asia. The AKDN works for the common good of all citizens regardless of their origin, gender, or religious affiliation. It has become one of the largest private development organizations in the world.

The promotion of pluralism and the strengthening of civil society are two critical aspects of the Aga Khan’s work. He has often spoken of the need for pluralism as both a precondition for successful development and a way of building trust between communities that are ignorant of each other. A new initiative to establish a Global Centre for Pluralism is an attempt to ameliorate this dangerous “Clash of ignorance.” He has also expressed his hope that in the near future, new or expanded civil society organizations ranging from universities to village organizations will assist the developing world build confident, self-reliant societies. Philanthropy can play an important part in assisting these nations, and the Muslim ummah in particular, establish a new era of flourishing economies, progressive legal and political systems, and institutions of higher education that are on the frontiers of research and knowledge.

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